PCT-59819

Regni Mexicani seu Nova Hispaniae Ludovicianus (..) - Homann Heirs (c.1720)

  • Technic: Engraving / etching with contemporary hand colouring on hand laid (verge) paper.
  • Condition: Good, given age. Edges with several small tears, not affecting image. Some staining and light soiling in the margins. Some minor crinkles and creases. Original middle fold as issued. General age-related toning and/or occasional minor defects from handling. Please study scan carefully.
  • Date: 1720
  • Overall size: 24,4 x 21,1 inch
  • Image size: 22,6 x 18,8 inch
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Description: Antique Map, titled: 'Regni Mexicani seu Nova Hispaniae Ludovicianus, N. Angliae, Carolinae, Virginiae et Pensylvaniae (…).' - This superb map covers the region from the Great Lakes and Nova Scotia through Central America, the Caribbean and Venezuela, and from New Mexico (naming Taos and Santa Fe) to the eastern seaboard. The map is based largely on Delisle's map of 1703 (Carte du Mexique et de la Floride), depicting the social, political, and economic outcomes from the War of the Spanish Succession, also known as Queen Anne's War. The British colonies are shown confined east of the Appalachians and extending south almost to St. Augustine, deep into Spanish-claimed territory. The map itself is filled with settlement place names, Indian tribes and villages. In present-day Texas, Corpus Christi and El Paso (el passo) are noted. Sea routes of treasure fleets from Vera Cruz and Cartagena to Havana and Spain are outlined. Richly embellished, a fine title cartouche depicts two native figures with items to trade, such as hides and blankets. In the Atlantic, there is a large scene of extensive gold mining operations, with Indians bringing their treasures to fill the Europeans' chest. Off the Pacific coast of Mexico is yet another opulent engraving of a raging sea battle, reminiscent of the battles fought in Queen Anne's War.

Source unknown, to be determined.

Artists and Engravers: Made by 'Homann Heirs' after an anonymous artist. Made by an anonymous engraver after 'Homann Heirs'. Following the long period of Dutch domination, the Homann family became the most important map publishers in Germany in the eighteenth century, the business being founded by J.B. Homann in Nuremberg about the year 1702. Soon after publishing his first atlas in 1707 he became a member of the Berlin academy of Sciences and in 1715 he was appointed Geographer to the Emperor. After the founder's death in 1724, the firm was continued under the direction of his son until 1730 and was then bequeathed to his heirs on the condition that it trades under the name of Homann Heirs. The firm remained in being until the next century and had a wide influence on map publishing in Germany. Apart from the atlases the firm published a very large number of individual maps. The Homanns produced a Neuer Atlas in 1714, a Grosser Atlas in 1737, and an Atlas Maior with about 300 maps in 1780. They also issued a special Atlas of Germany with full sized plans of principal cities, school atlases and an Atlas of Silesia in 1750 with 20 maps.